Dart Frogger Questionnaire

Keeping darts may be what you want to do but may not be what you should do right now. Here are some questions to help you decide weather you are ready to keep dart frogs.

 
#1 A friend has a pair of dart frogs (D. recitulatus) that are over 12 years old (this was written in 2000, it may be the number of years is much more now). Dart frogs, if kept well and given a chance, can live for many years. Are you ready for that commitment? Are you are ready for the commitment of a cat or dog?
Are you ready for the commitment?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#2 When I was growing up we had many pets; cats, dogs, pheasants, fish, snakes, lizards and more. I learned, as I grew, how to consistently care for animals and this greatly helped me with my frogs. Many skilled froggers stared in the fish hobby. Have you had some experiences with keeping animals? I believe experience in caring for a pet (no matter what it is) greatly improves your chances of succeeding with darts. Some people keep plants with such dedication that they are well ready for darts as well.
Do you have the experience needed to start keeping frogs?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#3 There is a definitely a time commitment that comes with keeping dart frogs. When your collection is small, it may be only a few minutes a day or every other day. Occasionally you can leave your frogs for longer but really you need a standard schedule of frog care.

Can you do you give some time each day or two to your frogs?
Yes ... or...
No

Click here to see my standard schedule

 
#4 Within an hour most unattended drinks, in my home, have fruit flies drowning in them. Dart frogs are predators who need to be fed small, live insects. Most froggers deal with the demand for their frogs food by rearing small insects (such a fruit flies). I producing thousands of fruit flies to feed my frogs and some of the flies escape to wonder my home getting into any beverage that is left out. Some people have a hard time having insects in their homes (or significant others have problems with it).
You must be comfortable about bugs, to keep darts, are you?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#5 Many people are under the misconception that if you touch a poison dart frog you will get sick and may even die. Very few wild dart frogs have toxins potent enough to injure humans. Captive bred frogs (which include the best starting frogs in the hobby) do not contain poison as the frog's poisons come from the frog's diet of tropical insects. Though Dendorobates are safe to touch they shouldn't be because handling can damage their skin (the same is true for most frogs) making them prone to infections. If you want a pet to hold or ride around on you get one with fur, feather, or scales.
Can you keep your hands off your frogs?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#6 A well set up dart frog tank has vigorously growing plants and plenty of place for the frogs to hide. Even the boldest dart frog might not always be visible. If you need constant visual access to your pet, maybe fish would be better for you.
Can you enjoy a pet you can't see all the time? A pet you can seldom see?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#7 People who keep dart frogs (or almost any frog) tend to have an interest in nature and natural beauty. They tend to enjoy the serenity that comes with frogging. Though it might not be major factor, if you don't enjoy a good book or a quite afternoon, frogging might not be the best hobby for you.
Are you interested in nature or do you at least want to be connected to the natural world?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#8 If you are reading this from the USA you are living in the most massive capitalist society the world has every seen. Like everything in the US, with dart frogs, there is a price to pay for starting into darts.  This is not out of the grasp of most people but will be around $200 (less if you can gather up what you need instead of buying all of it). Conversely it is very unlikely you will ever make money from keeping darts. Your frogs may be able to pay their board but if you are hoping to make a living off them, you, like many people in the past, will be greatly disappointed.
Can you afford keeping dart frogs? And not expect to make $ off of them?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#9 These frogs come from reasonably stable environments and you need to supply this environment. One of the biggest problem people have is keeping the temperature of the frogs vivarium between the 60's F to the low 80's. You need to keep the temperature within these rages or your dart frogs may freeze to death or die from heat stress.
Can you keep the temperatures stable for your frogs?
Yes ... or...
No
 
#10 Frogs aren't loved by all people, poison dart frogs can be feared because people hear the word "poison" and have all kinds of misconceptions of what that means. You may have problems with your housing situation with keeping dart frogs.
Will keeping dart frogs be a problem in your home?
Yes ... or...
No
 
Building a Tank: An easily and enjoyable way to move toward keeping frogs is setting up a terrarium. A well planted vigorously growing tank is a great first step to healthy and vigorously growing frogs. A vivarium that has been growing well for weeks, months or years is usually much healthier for frogs* than a newly set up tank . The skill for setting up a well growing tank takes practice, so get practicing click here.
 
The Firebelly Toad: A good way to start into dart frogging is to begin with and easy amphibian that will teach you the skills you will need in dart frogging. A number of skilled dart froggers agree that firebelly toads are a great starter. Click here for more information.
 
If you said "yes" to most of the questions and feel you are ready to start keeping dart frogs, figure out which dart frog is right for you. Pick a dart frog either by activity or by color. Please click here.
Before you start the frog hobby, be sure to read what your responsibilities to these frogs will be.
Click here to look for further Dart Frog Help
 
*Tanks that are set up for a while usually have micro fauna (small bugs) in them for the frogs to feed on and any insecticides that were on the plants is gone.
Copyright © 2007-2013, Tor Linbo & Trevor Anderson, tlinbo@u.washington.edu. All rights reserved. No part of this web site may be duplicated or retransmitted without the expressed permission of the authors. Based heavily on original web design by Trevor Anderson 1999.