Dart Frog Adult's List

An Icon list linked to information on some of the frogs I work with.

D. amazonicus ("red" D. ventrimaculatus) - They have metallic red backs with the classic black "Y" pattern (slightly reduced) and metallic blue-green legs. They have a single black nose spot (missing in some animals). This is a German line. As juveniles the legs are metallic blue-green with black spots, their backs are more gold than red. "Red Vent" is the common name.
   
   D. amazonicus ("red" D. ventrimaculatus) - Todd Kelley's line
   
   D. amazonicus ("Yellow Peruvian Vents") Rio Tigre, Perue
   

D. castaneoticus- The adults have black bodies with white, irregular, pin stripes. The limbs are dark with sunburst flash-marks, mid limb. It is supposedly in the "Vent" group of dart frogs, if so, it has the largest tadpoles of any of the members I've worked with. Called the "Brazil nut frog" because of its' tendency, in the wild, to rear its tads in the husk of Brazil nuts.
   

D. fantasticus- These have a sunset red head with back crown. The flaming color is broken up mid back by large irregular black spots. The limbs are a golden white covered by closely packed irregular black spots. One of my lines has bluish legs. My breeding stock is a combination of wild-caught's and F1's.
   

D. Imitator- Metallic spring green back covered by large, somewhat uniform, black spots. There are a pair of spots on the nose that is one of the defining characteristics of this species. The limbs are metallic blue / silver and stomach is green, all covered by black spots. These are from Alex Sens's collection.
   

(TIM) D. imitator- Metallic spring green, with some individuals having golden heads or rarely golden bodies, covered by large blackspots. There are a pair of spots on the nose that is one of the defining characteristics of this species. The limbs are metallic blue / silver and stomach is green, all covered by black spots. A line of Todd Kelley's.
   

(TW) D. imitator- Metallic bronze with regular medium sized back spots. There are a pair of spots on the nose that is one of the defining characteristics of this species. The limbs are metallic blue-green / silver and stomach is green, all covered by black spots. A line of Todd Kelley's crossing a WC with a Zoo animal.
   

(INT 1-2) D.intermedius- Their beautiful pattern looks like a metallic sunset with black clouds on it. The back spots and the amount of other colors in the animal are variable on this animal. Like imitator, they have the two nose spots although they are sometimes absent. "Red imitator" is a name that has been used for them and they do seem to be very closely related to D. imitator. There are reports that they are a hybrid of D. imitator and D. Fantasticus, but the tad development and behavior, in captivity, does not fit with this hypothesis, at least not a recent hybridization.
   

D. lamasi- A beautiful frog with with a vivid black and yellow striped back. Reports say these frogs are around D. imitator size, though the one remaining animal I have is stunted. I am actively looking for more of these frogs.
   

(RET1-5) D. reticulatus- Metallic blood-red back surrounded buy a large black spots. These fade into a closely packed collection of irregular shaped dark spots on a metallic gray to blue back ground. Some animals have halos of iridophores around these spots. Most animals have a small red mark on their chin. These are a wild caught breeding group. The froglets are similar in appearance to the adults, but often have a pair of black stripes, (some times broken in to spots ), running down their red backs.
   

(St Ret) D. reticulatus- Metallic blood-red back surrounded buy large black spots. These fade in to a closely packedcollection of irregular shaped dark spots on a metallic gray to blue background. Some animals have halos of iridophores around these spots. On the field of red are two parallel black stripes running from over their eyes down their backs. Some have a black nose spot. These are a wild caught breeding group. The froglets are similar in appearance to their parents.
   

D. variabilis- They have vivid metallic green backs with regular black spots. The legs are a grayish blue metallic with black spots on them. They have a single nose spot. This is a line from the Netherlands. They are what D. imitator, imitate.
   

(BLSV3) D. ventrimaculatus - These animals have coppery bronze legs with irregular black spots. Their backs are a lighter shade of yellow and there is usually less black, in the "Y" on their back, than other forms of D. amazonicus that I have. They have a single black nose spot, (missing in some animals), and black spotted, bluish white bellies. These animals were obtained as wild-caught's, but I have been unable to verify whether they truly are.
   

(BSSV4) D. ventrimaculatus - These animals have coppery bronze legs with irregular black spots. The back is gold with a black "Y" pattern irregularly on it. They have a single black nose spot, (missing in some animals), and black spotted, bluish white bellies. These animals were obtained as wild-caught's, but I have been unable to verify whether they truly are.
   

(BV1) D. ventrimaculatus - These have a gold back with the black "Y" on it. They have a single black nose spot, (missing in some animals), and bluish white bellies with black spots on them. The legs of the adults are a metallic green-blue with closely spaced irregular black spots on them. This line is from the Netherlands. As juveniles the legs are metallic blue with black spots.
   

(HV) D. ventrimaculatus - These have a deep gold back with the black "Y" on it. They have a single black nose spot, (missing in some animals), and bluish white bellies with black spots on them. The legs of the adults are a metallic bronze with closely spaced irregular black spots on them. This is a German line. As juveniles the legs are metallic olive with black spots.
   

(OV1-2) D. ventrimaculatus - These have a gold back with the black "Y" on it. They have a single black nose spot (missing in some animals) and bluish white bellies with black spots on them. The legs of the adults are a metallic bronze with closely spaced irregular black spots on them. This is a German line. As juveniles the legs are metallic olive with black spots.
   
   

"Colombian" D. histrionicus These black frogs with vivid orange/red spots are so beautiful that they've found their way into art. They clamber around on both ground and in vegetation, hunting for a meal. When hunting good or after a rain shower the males will give a "quack" like call. This type of D. histrionicus enjoys lower temperature with strong rain fall. I am actively looking for more of these frogs.
   

"New Valley morph" D. histrionicus The original "valley " morph came from Columbia, and was a bit smaller than this cousin from Ecuador. They do have the same yellow to red base coat covered by brown netting. They clamber around on both ground and in vegetation, hunting for a meal. When food is plentiful or after a rain shower the males will give a "quack" like call. This type of D. histrionicus enjoys temperature from the 70s to the 80s with high humidity.
   

"Blue" D. pumilio are one of the smallest and quietest calling pumilio. The blue goes from a vivid royal blue to a dusky navy blue. Sometimes they have black spots or speckling. They spend much of their time clambering through vegetation but rain showers will drive them to higher ground or branches.
   

"Blue Jean" D. pumilio populations are found throughout Central America. There is a great deal of variation in the leg color of these populations, going from deep blue to purple, to gray, or even to black. Some have red forelimbs, while other have the same coloring on their fore and hind limbs. The red backs of blue jeans can be spotted. These are bold pumilio and can easily be seen calling and fighting.
   

Red D. pumilio are also known as "Strawberry" pumilio. The name is obvious when you look at these bright red frogs with their backs covered by a speckling of small black dots.
   

Bastemento D. pumilio looks like a Jack O' Lanterns to me. These frogs are bright orange with a covering of large brown spots. My group are captive bred and have been actively producing offspring for themselves.
   

Bastemento D. pumilio come in all kinds of colors and patterns. These frogs are bright orange with a covering of black stripes. My group are captive bred, procured at FD, 2000.
   

Bastemento D. pumilio come in all kinds of colors and patterns. These frogs are bright orange/ red with a covering of small black spots. My group are captive bred, procured at FD, 2000.
   
   

E. bassleri- A wonderful 2.1 group from on of the European shipments in the late 90s. They were raised by a father and son team of hobbyists who fed their frogs so completely that they seemed to have grown to their maximum potential.
   

My E. femoralis came in from Peru amongst E. pictus in late 1999. The frogs were all young and have since grown well and are starting to show mating behavior. I am actively looking for more of these frogs.
   

In a Peruvian shipment from late 1999 a good number of E. hahneli came in. The subdued coloring on their back compliments the beautiful aqua blue of their bellies. Within this group is some slight variation, with some frogs having flash marks on both their back and front limbs, while most have flash marks only on their thighs. A number of my breeding groups have bred for me.
   

Many importers have brought in E. silverstonei, captive bred in Europe. My group is from one of these shipments. The frogs have grown well and are starting to color up. These animals seem to be very similar to tricolor in many ways including their call and the reds of their color being dietary. Breeding is likely similar so it should become a common frog.
   

This is an idealized E. tricolor. There is a population that looks like this, though it is a very uncommon type in nature, though very common in photos. 
   

(RON) 'Rio Minas' E. tricolor- Large tricolor, lipstick / blood red base color with off white stripes. The center stripe is much wider than the side stripes at the head, (some times leaving 2 red spots over the eyes), but tapers down toward the vent. These are F1's. The juveniles are brown with black spots, occasionally their side stripes show as they come out of the water but usually develop within one week.
   

''Santa Isabel' E. tricolor- A large and bold, (especially the males which are proudly vocal), tricolor. Lipstick / blood translucent red background with off white stripes. The center stripe is slightly wider than the side stripes and is sometimes broken. I have one F1 blood lines. The juveniles are brown with black spots, occasionally their side stripes show as they come out of the water but usually develop within one week.
   

'San Domingo' E. tricolor- A large and bold, (especially the males which are proudly vocal), tricolor. Lipstick / blood translucent red with off white stripes broken stripe. The center stripe is often only a couple small spots. Their side strips are often broken. These are F2s. The juveniles are brown with black spots, occasionally their side stripes show as they come out of the water but usually develop within one week.
   

'Salvias' E. tricolor-"P. anthonyi" A smaller, bold, wine red tricolor with a triplet of baby blue pinstripes. Splotched bluish white belly with slight orange / red flash marks in the pits of its arms and legs. I have F1 and F2 unrelated blood lines. The juveniles are brown with black spots, occasionally their side stripes show as they come out of the water but usually develop within one week.
   

P. anthonyi, Anthony's dart frog, was described from a recently preserved frog. Though I agree that tricolors should be split, in to at least two species, this frog appears to be what we would call an E. tricolor. The name "anthonyi" has been resurrected in recent years to describe a similar appearing frog. Read more about my thoughts on this topic by clicking on the icon.
   

'Giron Valley' E. tricolor- A shy, medium sized tricolor. Adults are brick red with slight blue/white striping. Their body shape is slightly different than other tricolors with their noses appearing to be rounder and their eyes more pronounced. My original breeding stock is 1.2.0 captive bred animals. The juveniles are brown with black spots.
   

'Moraspunga' E. tricolor- A large and bold tricolor. Stripes vary from lime to mint green on a coppery red back ground. Their sides are black and their bellies are covered with large greenish white spots, tightly packed, over a dark brown background. They have orange / red flash marks on the pit of their limbs. The generation of my breeding stock is unknown, but I can confirm they are at least F3's. The juveniles are brown with black spots, occasionally their side stripes show as they come out of the water but usually develop within one week.
   

E. trivitatus has a great diversity of appearance in its populations. There are populations with stripes from green to yellow to orange. There are populations lacking a median lateral stripe, having only two stripes. My group is from French Guyana and has two vivid green stripes on a black background.
   

"Green" P. aurotania have vivid metallic green stripes, beautifully turquoise speckled legs, and a musical bird like call. Their slight shyness and smaller size can easily be ignored. My group came from a European shipment from a few years ago.
   

"Wide Banded" P. aurotania may be the namesake of this species. Their back is a shimmering gold horseshoe. In some individuals the center of horseshoe is mostly filled in making them look partially covered by gold leaf. They are larger than other aurotania and have a louder call. These animals are offspring from Todd Kelley.
   

P. bicolor- A wonderful 2.1 group from on of the European shipments in the late 90s. They were raised by a father and son team of hobbyist who fed their frogs so completely that they seemed to have grown to their maximum potential. The are mostly yellow with their back legs sunsetting in to green.
   

P. vittatus- Received in a trade, their vivid orange horseshoe stripe is a wonderful counter point to their aqua and black speckled limbs.

The first book I got that had anything on the natural history of dart frogs in it was "The Care of Reptiles and Amphibians in Captivity" by Christopher Mattison. In the color section is a wonderful picture of D. leucomelas, in profile, on a leaf. It made me want to keep these bumblebee looking frogs. I organized a trade and due to shipping problems it was many months till I received the animals. My plans for my collection had changed greatly and I didn't think they'd fit but then I saw them. The frogs were in wonderful shape and had peculiar head coloring, (making it look like they had "eye spots"), and I was compelled to keep them.
   
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